ANY town planner I have spoken to says that the cost of re-locating Hobart Hospital will break the state.

Probably exaggerated, but surely the best alternative is, as has been done at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney, for the hospital to stay where it is, acquire adjacent buildings and expand the existing facility.

A sane solution would be for the Police Centre opposite, which occupies a whole city block and an enormous one at that, doesn’t need to be in the centre of Hobart, to re-locate. That building could then be adapted for offices or wards and it would be far less expensive than building and fitting out a new hospital in an inappropriate site. A further reason to consider this option is that the Menzies Centre for Cancer Research is diagonally opposite.

Heather Wellington, the woman retained as the Government’s most recent health consultant and the author of Tasmania’s Future Health Plan is somewhat of a eminence grise. After she was appointed in contentious circumstances to the board of the Portland Hospital, she was described in the Victorian Parliament by Dr Denis Napthine, Member for South West Coast, as “a rolled gold Labor mate.”

Her links to power are many and wide-ranging.

In one her roles she also works as a consultant to the Melbourne law firm DLA Phillips Fox. 

DLA Phillips Fox has been heavily involved in providing public/private partnership funding for major hospital redevelopments in Victoria. They have been involved in almost every major public/private partnership arrangement in the health sector in Victoria, from which they have no doubt made a lot of money.

As they probably would from the RHH.

Lindsay Tuffin

Surely the best alternative is, as has been done at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney, for the hospital to stay where it is, acquire adjacent buildings and expand the existing facility.  A sane solution would be for the Police Centre opposite, which occupies a whole city block and an enormous one at that, doesn’t need to be in the centre of Hobart, to re-locate. That building could then be adapted for offices or wards and it would be far less expensive than building and fitting out a new hospital in an inappropriate site. A further reason to consider this option is that the Menzies Centre for Cancer Research is diagonally opposite.