HAVING lived my life with the firm conviction that, being a member of as good a democratic society as there is on this planet, I must endeavour to uphold its laws under all circumstances. To the best of my knowledge I have done that and am trying to continue to do so.

But when leaders who should be role models act in a way that suggests there is reasonable evidence to bring prima facie charges of war crimes against them are rewarded with high national honours, it doesn’t make it any easier for Joe Blows like me to continue to stick to the straight and narrow.

I have said this before, and I say it again: John Howard, like George W. Bush and Tony Blair, should at least be put through the process of criminal trials considering the circumstances of their murderous, and ill-founded, invasion of Iraq. I believe they are guilty of war crimes. A jury panel of their peers may not find them so. But whatever the outcome of such trials, I still don’t enjoy seeing
people rewarded for their obscene abuse and destruction of, in the name of “democracy”, the lives of hundreds of thousands of helpless humans who never did any harm to Australia, Britain or the United States of GWB’s Moronica.

And while we are on the topic, I join, I am sure, with most Australians, in welcoming home our troops from Iraq. I am delighted that they have emerged mostly physically unscathed (though, I am
sure, there will be bits and pieces going on inside a lot of them that the marvels of modern science will never be able to remedy).

But I am not, as a military spokesman suggested I should be at the weekend, proud of Australia’s role in Iraq. As a loyal Australian, I deem it my duty to continue to feel shame on my country’s behalf that it allowed itself to become embroiled in a totally, absolutely totally, unnecessary conflict as a consequence of the deceitful spin of John Howard and his sycophant foot soldiers.

John Howard, I am sure, will accept his Queen’s Birthday Honours award. His action, by doing so, will reveal the measure of the man. I know politics is politics, but Kevin Rudd should be ashamed of having allowed Howard’s name ever to be slated for such an honour. Howard,  who I see as a disgrace to our country, should continue to be allowed to wander off into historical obscurity — unless, of course, there is someone with influence enough to bring him to trial.

Bob Hawkins

Bob Hawkins

John Howard, I am sure, will accept his Queen’s Birthday Honours award. His action, by doing so, will reveal the measure of the man. I know politics is politics, but Kevin Rudd should be ashamed of having allowing Howard’s name ever to be slated for such an honour. Howard,  who I see as a disgrace to our country, should continue to be allowed to wander off into historical obscurity — unless, of course, there is someone with influence enough to bring him to trial.