I WILL keep this short because the bald-headed wizard has said all and I’m quite drunk. But I would like to mention a few thoughts on Tas Times.

We share a strange world at a strange time in history. A world in which a global crisis can occur because people stop buying so many unsustainable unnecessary products, and our response is to find ways to encourage people to buy more unnecessary unsustainable products.

A world in which democracy is defined by politics, not people. A world where beauty is bulldozed for a quick buck, and the natural replaced by the false.

In such a world and such a time, a place for truth, thought, questions, debate and fun is of vital import.

Tas Times is such a place.

It is more than this:

It is a forum for those voiceless elsewhere in our media.

It keeps the writer’s style, not creating a homogenised medium, providing a more real form of communication.

It has helped creators create, whether writers or cartoonists.

And as we see here today it has created a kind of society, of people who may have different beliefs and truths, but are connected through tas times. A place where they can hear other views, their ideas can be critiqued and thoughts can be fine tuned.

It is our only truly democratic media, with no vested political or economic interests, something very rare. No one is excluded.

There is no master, well apart from the baldy wizard Lindsay, from whom I have learnt so much. From how to get banned from Monties, to the fine equilibrium that can be found between alcohol and exercise, and some stuff about journalism and truth as well. Particularly at our tas times meetings, where nothing gets done except for consumption of copious amounts of pinot and travels on a philosophical roller coster.

In the future when our time is looked back upon, it will be Tas times that provides the most truthful account of this time on our island. An account that provides the mood and feeling of a place, not just popular news.

Tas Times is like the Mountain for me now. It’s part of the soul of Tasmania. And its something I see everyday, but that still inspires me and fills me with wonder.

So keep reading, keep writing and spread the good word of Tas Times. Well done Linz. 

And long live Tas Times!

James Dryburgh
We share a strange world at a strange time in history. A world in which a global crisis can occur because people stop buying so many unsustainable unnecessary products, and our response is to find ways to encourage people to buy more unnecessary unsustainable products.  A world in which democracy is defined by politics, not people. A world where beauty is bulldozed for a quick buck, and the natural replaced by the false.