DEBATE about public access to the Battery Point foreshore veers between the old Looney Tunes of the cartoon world and the mayhem of ABC TV’s Midsomer Murders (in which it is surprising that anyone is left standing).

The point is illustrated by the latest missives in the Mercury, a letter (October 27) by David Edwards, public officer of the Battery Point Sullivans Cove Community Association and Leo Schofield’s last column (October 28).

First to Leo, who has bought into the battle.

Leo is one of those blow-ins who thinks he knows a thing or two the locals don’t. He thinks a walkway around the Battery Point shoreline is a loony scheme and predicts only a few people would use it and they would be so rugged up they would look like crazed loons. Readers of his column know that Leo and his Sydney friends suffered from the cold at his occasional home at Kempton and he has installed a new heating system which costs him a fortune in power bills.

Well, I have news for Leo: Tasmanians think the winters are brisk, not cold,  and head outdoors on the brilliantly sunny winter days which Hobart so often enjoys.

Leo questions the motives of the proponents of a walkway: “Could it possibly have anything to do with the proletariat taking on the capitalists who happen to own waterfront properties?” Now this is really loony!

As for David Edwards … he seems to think he is president for life. As he often says, he has been president for 12 years, apart from one year when there was a contested election. For heaven’s sake, this is a community association, not some former Soviet satellite.

David’s letter reads so reasonably that I suspect a spin doctor has penned it.  Certainly, when he speaks for himself, as he has done publicly on several occasions, he talks in terms of “hostile takeovers” of the community association. C’mon!  David was unnerved because Margaret Reynolds was standing against him as president. That’s democracry, not a takeover! However, the Exclusive Bruvvers of Battery Point orchestrated the result because David is their man.

David says in his long letter that to the best of his knowledge, the Hobart City Council is no longer pursuing an elevated structure “and Ms Pos has recently declared on ABC radion that she doesn’t support an elevated structure either.”  What I said was that I didn’t support a concrete walkway.  Who would? My first option has always been a low-tide path, or scramble track, but I wouldn’t object to an environmentally and aesthetically well designed, built walkway.

 

 

 

Margaretta Pos

Leo is one of those blow-ins who thinks he knows a thing or two the locals don’t. He thinks a walkway around the Battery Point shoreline is a loony scheme and predicts only a few people would use it and they would be so rugged up they would look like crazed loons. Readers of his column know that Leo and his Sydney friends suffered from the cold at his occasional home at Kempton and he has installed a new heating system which costs him a fortune in power bills.

Well, I have news for Leo: Tasmanians think the winters are brisk, not cold,  and head outdoors on the brilliantly sunny winter days which Hobart so often enjoys.